Metaphors and Beyond

Herein lies the trail of many a non-literal comparison . . .
Advance at your own risk.

And now a word from our Sponsor . . . Obi Wan??!

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Comparison: 

"There have been moments throughout my career, as I dutifully toiled in relative obscurity, that I can remember sorely wishing for one thing: Obi Wan Kenobi.

The yearning wasn’t so much about learning to use the force, though that would have been cool. But at particularly bleak times, I found myself hoping for someone older and wiser who could help guide me through what felt like confusing and often perilous waters. [context here]

A sponsor, Hewlett writes, is someone— like Obi Wan—who has some ‘juice.’ They don’t just want you to do well, they have the power to throw opportunity your way to make sure that you can.”

Context:

[comparison here] “Someone with more experience who perhaps could recognize that prized ineffable quality – call it ‘talent’ or ‘potential’ – that you often have difficulty seeing in yourself, who could not only urge you on, but help clear the way.

Over the years, I’ve certainly had mentors who were generous with their time and kept plentiful boxes of tissues in their offices. I’ve had supporters and cheerleaders. And I’m grateful for all those who’ve given me opportunities. But it wasn’t until I read about Sylvia Ann Hewlett’s new research in her book, ‘Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor,’ that I understood what I had been yearning for all those years was an advocate.

[comparison here] And unlike a mentor, who typically says his or her door is always open when you want to seek them out, true sponsorship happens behind closed doors, when you’re not there.”

Shulte, Brigid. “Searching for Obi Wan.” Washington Post 14 Nov. 2013. Web.

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Many thanks to Laurie Kelley of the University of Portland for posting about this article on LInkedIn and to Brigid Shulte for the force-ful comparison. May the Sponsor be with you!

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Comparison:

"Many curious atheists and Christians haven’t read the Bible because it reads like a 1970s computer manual."

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Context:

[comment reply to a Fast Company article]

"It isn’t enough to tighten the read, and drop the verse business.

 [comparison here]

 That’s why I wrote ‘Bobo’s Bible: A Dude Version of the Holy Bible,’ a clear – and faithful – version for people with a sense of humour.

 Here’s a sample…

 Leviticus 18: Incest No-Nos and Other Sex Rules

 Every incest combination is a no-no. Also, no gay men action. No sex with animals (even chickens).

 There were more options than just man on woman sex. Also, a bit of leeway with distant relations. Sex with your mother-in-law was not forbidden – it’s just insane. Great grand parents and great grand children is not expressly forbidden, just monstrously wrong. I’m guessing both these scenarios would involve people who are beyond all help or redemption.

 Non-related lesbian sex is okay! Everybody loves lesbians.

 http://www.amazon.com/Bobos-Bible-Dude-Version-Holy-ebook/dp/B00H2A1WHG

 Bobo”

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Bobo. Comment on webpage article. “Redesigning the Bible with Readability in Mind.” by John Brownlee. “Redesigning the Bible with Readability in Mind.” Fast Company 18 July 2014. Web. Fast Company 18 July 2014. Web.

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Please hold the flame responses from 70s computer manual enthusiasts; and thanks to Bobo for the page-turning comparison.

But the encyclopedia was so . . . alphabetic!

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Comparison:

"He [Adam Lewis Green] also argues that the Bible was originally meant to be experienced, not as a spiritual encyclopedia, but as literature."

Context:

"It might seem like a relatively strange way to present the Bible, but as Greene points out, the verse and chapter numbers we associate with the Bible as reference points are actually relatively recent additions, having first been introduced in the Medieval era. [comparison here]

‘Today, our contemporary bibles are ubiquitously dense, numerical, and encyclopedic in format; very different from how we experience other classic and foundational literature, and completely foreign to how the original authors conceived of their work,’ [Adam Lewis] Greene writes.”

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Brownlee, John. “Redesigning the Bible with Readability in Mind.” Fast Company 18 July 2014. Web.

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Thanks to Adam Lewis Green for the vade mecum comparison, and to John Brownlee for sending it along.

wtwtare:

A toadstool being used as a …toad stool

Very nice “inside-out” visual metaphor.  Well done. Thanks!

wtwtare:

A toadstool being used as a …toad stool

Very nice “inside-out” visual metaphor.  Well done. Thanks!

(via xineann)

“A short story can be held in the mind in all one piece. It’s less like a building than a fiendish device. Every bit of it must be cunningly made and crafted to fit together perfectly and without waste so it can perform its task with absolute precision. That purpose might be to move the reader to tears or wonder, to awaken the conscience, to console, to gladden, or to enlighten. But each short story has one chief purpose, and every sentence, phrase, and word is crafted to achieve that end. The ideal short story is like a knife - strongly made, well balanced, and with an absolute minimum of moving parts.”

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Michael Swanwick (via writingquotes)

Comparison:

The ideal short story is like a knife - strongly made, well balanced, and with an absolute minimum of moving parts.”

Context:

[see re-post above]

Very nice comparison—concise, cutting, and vivid. Thanks to Michael Swanwick for the comparison and to Daphne Gray-Grant (@pubcoach) whose tweet guided the way.

I’d like to teach the world to . . . . Zuck?!

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Comparison:

But one way to think of Facebook is as the Coca-Cola of social media.

Warren Buffet is addicted to Coca-Cola. He’s never sold a share in Coke because it has always offered a flavor to please his taste buds: cherry and orange, and lemon-lime sodas, energy drinks, flavored waters, organic juices, and teas. Coke serves 1.9 billion drinks per day because the 122-year-old conglomerate recognized long ago that customers will forever thirst for something new. Whenever and wherever you are thirsty, Coca-Cola will be there for you. Zuck wants Facebook to be just like that. When you think about it, social media at first seemed to be a kind of basic cola designed for all tastes. But, of course, it has proved to be much more than that. Especially after online interactions migrated to mobile devices, users began craving more specialized flavors, encompassing everything including communication via photos, instant messaging, group and video chats, and more. Zuck wants Facebook to be involved, in some way, in each of these exchanges. Frankly, he has no choice but to try if he’s going to achieve his goal of adding 5 billion more active users—Coca-Cola–like ubiquity—and creating a business that makes today’s Facebook seem tiny.

The Coca-Cola of social media won’t look like today’s Facebook because it will become less and less reliant on the basic cola—the desktop experience that was rather clunkily transported to that big blue app on your phone or tablet.  [emph. added]

Context:

This isn’t an analogy you’ll hear from anyone at Facebook, in part because it sounds crazy, and in part because Zuckerberg just doesn’t seem to be making his strategy clear these days. [comparison here]

‘There was a lot of debate ­internally as to whether all these experiences should live in the core Facebook app or whether they should live in separate applications,’ says Josh Williams, the Gowalla cofounder who spent a year and a half at Facebook after it acquired (and shut down) his startup. ‘Should there be a Facebook Local app? A Facebook location app? A lot of people, including myself, thought that should be the case instead of shoving them in the more drawer on the core app.’ (The more drawer he’s referring to is the button on the bottom right of the Facebook app, under which it has slotted things like Groups and Nearby Places.)

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Carr, Austin. “Facebook Everywhere.” Fast Company July 2014. 62-63. [56-68; 92]

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Many thanks to Austin Carr for this refreshing (real thing) comparison!

Twitter / arishapiro: Jerusalem mad-libs: Trying ...

Wow, interesting range of expressing items at the intersection of “difficult” and “unlikely.”  Thanks to Ari Shapiro for the prompt.

comicbookcovers:

Action Comics #469, March 1977, cover by Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez, Bob Oksner, and Tatjana Wood

Gives a whole new perspective to the idiom comparison “this is not my first rodeo!”

comicbookcovers:

Action Comics #469, March 1977, cover by Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez, Bob Oksner, and Tatjana Wood

Gives a whole new perspective to the idiom comparison “this is not my first rodeo!”

kevinpledger:

When great #leaders sense a storm, they consult meteorologists, not just send their teams out for umbrellas. #Wisdom is knowing where to find the best answer and realizing it’s not always you. @kevinpledger #leadership

When great rhetors sense an insight, they utilize a #metaphor; they don’t just send their minds and pens out to find a proposition. #Insight comes from finding the best analog and realizing the perspective it will offer an audience. metaphorsandbeyond #communication  Thanks to Kevin Pledger for the stormy comparison.

kevinpledger:

When great #leaders sense a storm, they consult meteorologists, not just send their teams out for umbrellas. #Wisdom is knowing where to find the best answer and realizing it’s not always you. @kevinpledger #leadership

When great rhetors sense an insight, they utilize a #metaphor; they don’t just send their minds and pens out to find a proposition. #Insight comes from finding the best analog and realizing the perspective it will offer an audience. metaphorsandbeyond #communication  Thanks to Kevin Pledger for the stormy comparison.

(via goodideaexchange)

“Just like a speaking coach will tell you not to fill empty space with “um,” you should avoid framing your answer as a rehearsed pitch by starting with “so.” Next time you’re asked, “What do you do?” try dropping the “so.” You’ll appear much more confident.”

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How A Popular Two-Letter Word Is Undermining Your Credibility (via fastcompany)

Before you listen to the speaking “coach” too quickly, read Michael Erard’s book: 

Um…: Slips, Stumbles, and Verbal Blunders, and What They Mean

and see if the “coach” know that about which he/she speaks.

http://amzn.to/1n2AXUR

(via fastcompany)